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Annotation

Amminger GP, Schäfer MR, Papageorgiou K, Klier CM, Cotton SM, Harrigan SM, Mackinnon A, McGorry PD, Berger GE. Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids for indicated prevention of psychotic disorders: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Arch Gen Psychiatry . 2010 Feb 1 ; 67(2):146-54. PubMed Abstract

Comments on Paper and Primary News
Primary News: Thinking Outside the Pillbox: Fish Oil and Exercise for Schizophrenia?

Comment by:  William Carpenter, SRF Advisor (Disclosure)
Submitted 16 February 2010 Posted 16 February 2010

The most controversial recommendation being considered by the DSM-V Psychoses Work Group involves creating a risk syndrome section and placing psychosis risk as a class in this new section. The September 2009 issue of Schizophrenia Bulletin carried a concept piece on the risk syndrome by Heckers, a validity report by Woods et al., and an editorial detailing Work Group considerations by me. Reliability has been established among experts, but to eventually make this recommendation for DSM-V, we will have to demonstrate reliability in ordinary clinical settings by ordinary clinicians. Even then, substantial opposition is anticipated, and it seems more likely headed for the appendix (in need of further study) than prime time as a diagnostic class.

Opposition is based primarily on three concerns: 1) high false-positive rates, 2) harm related to stigma and excessive drug prescribing, and 3) lack of an evidence-based therapeutic approach...  Read more


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Primary News: Thinking Outside the Pillbox: Fish Oil and Exercise for Schizophrenia?

Comment by:  Stuart Maudsley
Submitted 19 February 2010 Posted 19 February 2010

The recent work of Pajonk and colleagues is one of the most recent demonstrations of the beneficial neurological actions of physical exercise. Physical activity not only can improve cardiovascular health directly, but also appears to engender a strong neurotrophic effect that can be isolated somewhat from the cardiovascular actions. Recreational physical activity has been demonstrated to improve learning and memory functions in healthy adults (Winter et al., 2007), reduce the risk of dementia in elderly patients (Karp et al., 2006; Vaynman and Gomez-Pinilla, 2006), attenuate progression and development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) (Wilson et al., 2002), and productively increase brain volume in areas concerned with spatial memory and executive function (Colcombe et al., 2006; Erickson et al., 2009)....  Read more


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Primary News: Thinking Outside the Pillbox: Fish Oil and Exercise for Schizophrenia?

Comment by:  Anthony Hannan
Submitted 19 February 2010 Posted 19 February 2010
  I recommend this paper

These important new papers (Amminger et al., 2010; Pajonk et al., 2010) suggest interesting approaches for delaying/preventing onset of, and treating, schizophrenia. As the interventions, and cohorts, are very different, it is likely the therapeutic mechanisms are distinct; however, in both cases neurobiological insights may be provided by animal models.

The exercise study (Pajonk et al., 2010) is supported by experimental studies involving environmental manipulations of animal models, which may provide some insight into underlying mechanisms. There is prior evidence, in a knockout mouse model of schizophrenia exhibiting predictive validity, that environmental enrichment (which enhances mental/physical activity levels) from adolescence onwards can ameliorate schizophrenia-like endophenotypes (McOmish et al., 2008). While this model does exhibit hippocampal dysfunction, these mutant mice...  Read more


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