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Annotation

Hahn CG, Wang HY, Cho DS, Talbot K, Gur RE, Berrettini WH, Bakshi K, Kamins J, Borgmann-Winter KE, Siegel SJ, Gallop RJ, Arnold SE. Altered neuregulin 1-erbB4 signaling contributes to NMDA receptor hypofunction in schizophrenia. Nat Med . 2006 Jul 1 ; 12(7):824-8. PubMed Abstract

Comments on Paper and Primary News
Primary News: Neuregulin, ErbB4—Levels Normal but Signaling Strengthened in Schizophrenia

Comment by:  Patricia Estani
Submitted 22 June 2006 Posted 22 June 2006
  I recommend this paper

Primary News: Neuregulin, ErbB4—Levels Normal but Signaling Strengthened in Schizophrenia

Comment by:  Cynthia Shannon Weickert, SRF AdvisorVictor Chong
Submitted 8 August 2006 Posted 8 August 2006

In contrast to its once barren form, the table of potential causative genes for schizophrenia is now stocked to feast level (Straub and Weinberger, 2006). In keeping with the culinary theme, we suggest that this recent paper by Chang-Gyu Hahn and Hoau-Yan Wang is “a full course meal”!

Appetizer: An Important Biological Problem
If one assumes that alterations in NRG-1 account for at least some of the liability to developing schizophrenia, then it is only reasonable to look to the NRG-1 receptors for clues as to how and where NRG-1 may be acting. However, there are three known NRG-1 receptors that mediate a myriad of biological functions, almost all of which could be argued to be relevant to schizophrenia pathology. This paper draws our attention to one NRG-1 receptor, ErbB4, showing this receptor to be a probable NRG-1 partner in mediating this pathology. Recent studies provide further support that ErbB4 may be integral to the development of schizophrenia by demonstrating its gene to...  Read more


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